Tunisia: Prime Minister Sacked and Parliament Dissolved after Violent Protests

A serious political crisis has arisen in Tunisia, North Africa. The matter is so serious that the opposition is even calling it a 'coup'.
Tunisia: Prime Minister Sacked and Parliament Dissolved after Violent Protests
Image Credit: BBC

Tunisia's president has fired the country's prime minister and dissolved parliament. All this happened because people in Tunisia were angry with the government's failure to deal with the corona epidemic and were demonstrating across the country. These protests turned violent.

On Sunday, a large number of protesters took to the streets in almost every area of ​​Tunisia and had violent clashes with the police. After this whole incident, President Kais Syed dismissed Prime Minister Hicham Mekichi and also dissolved Parliament.

The decision was taken 'to save the country: President

The President says that he did this with the intention of bringing peace to the country and he will handle the situation with the help of the new Prime Minister. Kais Syed called an emergency security meeting and then came on TV and addressed the people.

Image Credit: BBC
Image Credit: BBC

"We have taken this decision. Until social peace is restored in Tunisia and until we save our country," he said. The president also said that Tunisia's constitution allows him to dissolve parliament in the face of "potential danger". However, the opposition has called it a 'coup'.

President joined the celebration of the protesters

On Sunday night, when the news of the Prime Minister's sacking came, the protesters started celebrating. Even President Kais Saied himself joined the celebration with the protesters in the capital Tunis. Before that, thousands of protesters had demonstrated against the ruling party in many other cities including the capital.

People were demanding the dissolution of Parliament and were shouting 'get out. In view of the gravity of the situation, government security forces had closed the lanes around Central Avenue. This area was also the center of the Arab Spring in the year 2011. Police fired tear gas at the protesters and arrested hundreds of people. In many cities, there were also clashes with the security personnel of the protesters.

Image Credit: BBC
Image Credit: BBC

Protesters barged into the offices of the ruling party Enada and set fire to computers and other items there. The party has condemned the attacks and said it was a "criminal gang" whose aim was to create "ruckus and ruin".

'If there is violence, the army will deal'

The President has warned that if such violence occurs in the future, it will be dealt with by military force. He said, "I want to warn all those who are thinking of taking up arms. Whoever fires, the army will answer them with bullets." In the midst of all this, the speaker of the Tunisian parliament, Rach Ganacchi, accused the president of a 'coup'. "We are still obeying parliament. Supporters of the Enada party and the people of Tunisia will save the revolution," he told Reuters news agency.

Democracy came from the Arab Spring but…

Ten years ago today, that is, in the year 2011, the revolution in Tunisia had paved the way for democracy in the country and gave birth to a movement known as the Arab Spring in this area. People had hoped that after the coming of the democratic government, jobs and employment opportunities would increase for them, but they were disappointed.

Image Credit: BBC
Image Credit: BBC

Today, a decade after the Arab Spring, Tunisia is grappling with a serious economic crisis and the coronavirus pandemic. The increased infection cases in recent weeks had added to the pressure on the Tunisian economy. Given the seriousness of the situation, Prime Minister Hicham Mekichi fired the health minister last week, but this proved insufficient to quell public anger.

Like and Follow us on :

Related Stories

No stories found.
Since Independence
www.sinceindependence.com